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Report - - L&NWR Wolverton Rail Coachworks, December 2011 | Industrial Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk
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Report - L&NWR Wolverton Rail Coachworks, December 2011

Landie_Man

"Landie" or Harry
Regular User
#1
Thanks a million to Els for doing the driving on this one. This was one hell of an interesting place with lots of little artifacts left behind. The natural decay was truly epic, especially for the closure date, believed to be about 1993-4.

Information from Wikipedia.

Wolverton railway works was established in Wolverton, Buckinghamshire, by the London and Birmingham Railway Company in 1838 at the midpoint of the 112 mile-long route from London to Birmingham. The line was developed by Robert Stephenson following the great success of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway line.

The Victorian era new towns of Wolverton and New Bradwell were built to house the workers and service the works. The older towns of Stony Stratford and Newport Pagnell grew substantially too, being joined to it by a tramway and branch line (known as the "Newport Nobby"), respectively. The trams were also hauled by steam locomotives: the tram cars were certainly the largest ever in the UK and possibly the world.

As of 2010, the facility is much reduced: Railcare operates a full-scale train maintenance, repairs and refurbishment works at the western end of the site, the central area is derelict but slated for redevelopment as canal-side housing, the eastern end is a Tesco store, apart from another canal-side housing development at the extreme eastern end.
On looking at blogs and photo collections, Fred Dibnah demolished a chimney here in 1993!

Lots of things left from the days of coach building here, a really nice relaxed explore.

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There was notices from 1989 on the notice board, and it looked like some sort of open day had happened soon before closure, with lots of signage and even what looked like some sort of stall errected for such an event

more at:
 

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