Web
Analytics
Report - - NCB Stoke Orchard Revisited - 11/01/2009 | Industrial Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - NCB Stoke Orchard Revisited - 11/01/2009



clebby

( . Y . )
Regular User
#1
As it was only a short cycle ride away, and I had had a lazy weekend doing nothing but watching Friends and eating chocolate fingers, me and da-mop decided we would once again visit this still little-documented site - the NCB Coal Research Establishment at Stoke Orchard.

As I have already given the history in my earliest report from November (http://www.28dayslater.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34722&), I shall make this brief...

The NCB Coal Research Establishment was opened in 1950 by British Coal's Jacob Bronowski, to test and research methods of extracting crude oil from coal. The CRE's scientists succeeded,, however, the proess was very expensive and complicated, and was therefore not deemed economically viable. When the British coal industry was privatised in 1994, funding was no longer available and it closed its doors a few years afterwards.

We managed to see a large portion of the site - reaching the test laboratories and the main extraction plant. Anyway, on with the pictures...

One of the many chimneys that make up the extraction facilities - the part of the site most visible from the surrounding area...

IMG_6155.jpg


Inside, most machinery was left in-situ. The ground floor was by far the largest and by the looks of it the loading bay. These giant pieces of machinery were left behind...

IMG_6349.jpg


This gives an idea of the vast size of the room...

IMG_6250.jpg


The loading bay had its own control room. The weighing scales in the background of this shot went up to 5 tonnes!

IMG_6266.jpg


Off to the side of the loading bay was a room that was full of control panels - no doubt for the enormous machines upstairs...

IMG_6274.jpg

IMG_6275.jpg


The first floor was more like a balcony over the ground floor, but it had some shelves crammed full of valves, taps, screws, bolts, old tools, g-cramps and everything imaginable relating to to a factory.

IMG_6209.jpg

IMG_6286.jpg


Pipes and taps ran around the building - I can only assume they were used to transport water and coolant.

IMG_6297.jpg

IMG_6277.jpg


The second floor was an enormous room, mostly taken up by some colossal hoppers. The hoppers led straight down to the ground floor loading bay, as the first floor was off to the side. This, I can only assume, was where the finished product was loaded onto trucks.

IMG_6299.jpg

IMG_6308.jpg


Also present were some bizzare spherical-shaped structures, higher than a man, which were made of wire and had two electrodes. A current was obviously passed through, though I cannot imagine why.

IMG_6304.jpg


This was where the current was passed in, via some electrodes...

IMG_6305.jpg


The third floor was a lot lower, and was taken up by the tops of the hoppers, where whatever went through them was fed into the the main hopper. There were also a lot more pipes up here...

IMG_6315.jpg

IMG_6314.jpg


Access to the roof and the bases of the chimneys was from this room. The roof was flooded but had now frozen, so the way across it was via a rotten, rickety wooden walkway. At the other end of the roof was a large metal furnace-like structure. One of the rooms contained hoist machinery, but the other contained a bizarre furnace that was painted red and had lots of porcelain dips in the floor. This place was full of suprises.

IMG_6340.jpg


After we left, we proceeded to the proper research facilities, and a quick peep through the windows revealed what we were looking for - labs.

Access was interesting, to say the least, but once inside the labs were incredible.

IMG_6399.jpg


There were 3 different gas taps for 3 different gases...

IMG_6398.jpg

IMG_6405.jpg


The fume cupboards were equally as impressive - containing dials and guages one would not expect to find...

IMG_6401.jpg

IMG_6410.jpg


Off to the right of the labs was another machine room; this time very tall and crammed to bursting point with equipment.

IMG_6354.jpg

IMG_6358.jpg


These included a large engine that powered a drive belt, which in turn powered some huge cogs.

IMG_6376.jpg

IMG_6383.jpg


There were also some side rooms that also appeared to be labs, only this time much more industrial.

IMG_6366.jpg


There was also an office that was packed full of various coal related paperwork, some of it unopened.

IMG_6367.jpg

IMG_6369.jpg

IMG_6370.jpg
 
Last edited:

clebby

( . Y . )
Regular User
#2
NCB Stoke Orchard Revisited - 11/01/2009 REPORT

The extraction facilities were so large they required there own water tower, separate from that of the sites main one, but almost the same height. It offered stunning views, but the rusted top creaked and groaned under our weight. It was still a nice place to eat our Hula-Hoops though! :p

IMG_6434.jpg

IMG_6436.jpg

IMG_6447.jpg

IMG_6451.jpg

IMG_6454.jpg


Even though I saw a lot there is still a lot more to see - so watch out for another report! ;)
 

Da-Mop

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#3
Da-Mop's photos of NCB Coal Research Establishment

Just some of my best photos from the two days we were there. Even though we saw a massive amount we think we have barely done half the site.

Won't bother with a history but if you want to see my previous visit look on
http://www.28dayslater.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34730&highlight=NCB+coal+research

Since I am still to see the rest of the site and will be returning, PM me or Clebby if you want to tag along. It really is an awesome site sidewise and since so much was simply left behind and not vandalised.

Anyway time for the photos.
CopyofIMG_2470.jpg

CopyofIMG_2473.jpg

CopyofIMG_2474.jpg

CopyofIMG_2476.jpg

CopyofIMG_2478.jpg

CopyofIMG_2492.jpg

IMG_2529.jpg

IMG_2530.jpg

IMG_2532.jpg

IMG_2546.jpg

IMG_2550.jpg

IMG_2551.jpg

IMG_2556.jpg

IMG_2557.jpg

IMG_2563.jpg

IMG_2564.jpg

IMG_2581.jpg

IMG_2584.jpg

IMG_2587.jpg

IMG_2593.jpg

IMG_2610.jpg

IMG_2611.jpg

IMG_2612.jpg

IMG_2617.jpg

IMG_2645.jpg

IMG_2665.jpg

IMG_2666.jpg

IMG_2667.jpg


Hope you enjoyed the pics.
 
E

e5daz

Guest
Guest
#4
Re: NCB Stoke Orchard Revisited - 11/01/2009 REPORT

Gee that brings back some memorys lol
Some of them rooms I use to work in lol

IMG_6304.jpg


This is what we called the Cage.. Basicly it measured heat of a fire source.there use to be sensors inside the cage fix to the x parts.

IMG_6366.jpg


use to work in here some times. Coal came in in them blue tubs.. then we used the sivs that you can see in the pic on the left stood up to seperate the different sizes.. theres a machine in the corner that you fitted the siv in and it shook left n right lol..

Once they were seperated they went in the oven to dry out as they use to be wet with moisture..;)
 
E

e5daz

Guest
Guest
#5
Re: NCB Stoke Orchard Revisited - 11/01/2009 REPORT

Depends which labs you mean mate there were so many..
Alot of the left hand side of the site was unused when i worked there.. i think a small part was used to make brickets.. Basicly pressing the coal into small shapes.Which we then tested.

Im sure some of the site is still active? I was told where I use to work they still used..
Part with many fire places in the centre? and offices up stairs?
 

Similar threads