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Report - - Norfolk's wind pumps..July-December 2020 | Industrial Sites | Page 2 | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Norfolk's wind pumps..July-December 2020


Mikeymutt

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Really like these - it's rare to find wind-powered mills with anything at all inside, and there's quite a bit here.

I agree with the previous comment about old photos if you have them - would like to see what a 'scoop' looked like.
Thank you. I will try get some for you. The scoop wheels are nice. Similar looking to a water wheel really. Thought this,would be your thing
 

clebby

( . Y . )
Regular User
Love reports like this. As what might be considered traditional ‘bread and butter’ explores slowly dry up, its great to see people getting creative and still finding interesting stuff that would have previously been overlooked!
 

Calamity Jane

i see beauty in the unloved, places & things
Regular User
Really interesting stuff. Well done on a great compilation, well documented, researched really well. great shots. Those wheels are quite special. Tunstall Dyke Mill what a stunning little gem. How long did it take to complete the rounds and research on this cracker?
 

Mikeymutt

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Love reports like this. As what might be considered traditional ‘bread and butter’ explores slowly dry up, its great to see people getting creative and still finding interesting stuff that would have previously been overlooked!
Thank you. Like most I will visit the bread and butter places what interest me. But I like to dry and do the different little things as well.
 

Mikeymutt

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Really interesting stuff. Well done on a great compilation, well documented, researched really well. great shots. Those wheels are quite special. Tunstall Dyke Mill what a stunning little gem. How long did it take to complete the rounds and research on this cracker?
Thank you. It was not too bad. They were quite easy to find as lots of info online about them. Depends if you don't mind walking. I have another one to do and it's an hour and a half walk to it, and then back. So it's going to be a case of putting my bike in the boot
 

albino-jay

28DL Regular User
Regular User
Fantastic report. Love stuff like this. Another for historical photo’s if you have them. I find it really interesting seeing things in their former glory to compare how far they have gone downhill. Cracking report though, top work mate.
 

Mikeymutt

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Fantastic report. Love stuff like this. Another for historical photo’s if you have them. I find it really interesting seeing things in their former glory to compare how far they have gone downhill. Cracking report though, top work mate.
Cheers mate. Seems like the historical photos are a must. I have had a look and seems there are some for most. Not sure to post in a reply or add to report. I love little things like this. Just as much history in it as a big factory. And not one umbex sticker to be seen
 

Jackdaw47

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
I always try to document as much of my home county's fading history when I get spare days at the weekend. I have covered the railways and most of the military stuff here. So thought I would try and document the wind pumps. So I have selected a variety of them to look at. Some were nice and easy to get too, but others were long walks or fighting through reeds and brambles to get too. If you have ever driven down the ache straight to Great Yarmouth you could be mistaken that you are in Holland with the land flat for miles around. Along the landscape is lots of wind pumps, often mistaken for windmills. These pumps were built to drain the flat fields, the water would drain into dykes and the pumps would push the water in to the broads or the rivers. Or they would drain the marshes and the water would be pushed into large dykes. Some of these date back to the 17th century and were originally wind powered, later on they would have diesel, electric and even steam powered. The wind would move the sails which was basically a turbine powered by wind. This would turn gearing on the upper floor and this in turn would move a vertical shaft that would power cogs on the ground to either drive an eternal or internal wheel. Well that's what I could work out whilst looking at them. I really need to visit a restored working one to see how it all goes properly.

BOYCE'S MILL

Can't find too much on this mill, it was originally a three storey one, but like so many it was reduced to two storeys after the removal of the wooden cap and sails. I had done some digging and it seems it was constructed in 1770. It was later converted to steam powered and the remains of the steam engine shed is still there adjoining the wind pump. The mill race what the scoop would sit in is still whole.

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LIMPENHOE MILL

So this was one I had seen old pics of and fancied it due to some old machinery remaining inside, so i took the long walk to it. Upon approaching it I was disappointed to see that the door has had bricks relaid were the hole was, same with the windows. Well I guess it stops it getting vandalised or the weather getting to it quicker which ain't a bad thing. But it was a pleasant day and a nice walk, and the wind pump is nice and still hadn't he original a coop wheel on it which was good. The mill was constructed in 1831 on the banks of the river yare. It was built by millwright William Thorold, and was paid for by each person who owned some of the marshland. Cost would be judged on how many acres they owned.

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LUDHAM BRIDGE NORTH MILL

This was one of two of two mills near Ludham bridge, the other tower was demolished to make way for a mooring. Built in 1887 it was a rare pump that it had anti clockwise sails to pump the water directly into the river. It suffered gale damage in the 1910's and can imagine it was never repaired. Quite unique this one as well that it was used as a watch tower, then converted in to a pill box during the Second World War. The gun apertures have been built nicely into the existing brickwork. There is also a spigot mortar base hidden in the bushes which was nice to see. This pilbox would have provided defence from an attack up the river.

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TBC
Very interesting they must have had these all over the place a cheap means to move water from A to B. the cast frame for the sails looks pretty solid, and would mean that the internal structure would have had to be pretty solid, since they would work 24 hours seven days a week good pics and history.
 

Airfix

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Wow, that's a brilliant report and photographs very interesting. Surprised how much is left and not graffiti.
 

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