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Report - - Pen yr Orsedd Quarry Wales oct 17 | Mines and Quarries | 28DaysLater.co.uk
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Report - Pen yr Orsedd Quarry Wales oct 17

monk

mature
Regular User
#1
Been down here a few times now, really nice place for a mooch about in and A stunning location.

The Pen-yr-orsedd Slate Quarry is located to the north of Nantlle village. An open working, it opened in about 1816 as hillside galleries. Mills were built on three successive levels, the first in 1860 and the next, their first integrated mill, in 1870. The upper mill followed in 1898. Output in 1882 was 8251 tons with 230 men employed. Output was far higher in the 1890s with 613 men employed in 1898. The first connection to the Nantlle railway was by incline via Pen y Bryn (NPRN 33674) until this area was tipped on and direct connection to the railway was made. After closure of the Nantlle line in 1963 road transport was used. The quarry was made up of a series of pits and its most notable feature in the later years was the complex series of four aerial ropeways known as 'Blondins', with Bruce Peebles electrical equipment of 1906. The use of the Blondins gradually ceased, a lorry road being built down into one pit in use in the 1980s. There is also a surviving engine house on the site. The quarry remained in use, as small scale workings from the 1980s until production ceased in about 2000.
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Blondins
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The Lone Ranger

Safety is paramount!
Staff member
Moderator
#7
Very nice, looks like you had perfect weather too :thumb

Looks like the interesting stuff must have been beyond where I got to, there was a guy working with a JCB when I paid it a visit.
 
Last edited:

monk

mature
Regular User
#8
Very nice, looks like you had perfect weather too :thumb

Looks like the interesting stuff must have been beyond where I got to, there was a guy working with a JCB when I paid it a visit.
Cheers, to be fair it looks like you covered most of it, I wonder if the jcb that you saw was from the two big sheds at the top which could possibly have been in use when you visited.
 

The Lone Ranger

Safety is paramount!
Staff member
Moderator
#10
Cheers, to be fair it looks like you covered most of it, I wonder if the jcb that you saw was from the two big sheds at the top which could possibly have been in use when you visited.
It looked as if they were still working it, but on a very small scale, was the same at Moel Tryfen Quarry, but that looked on a slightly larger scale. Local slate for local people?
 

monk

mature
Regular User
#11
It looked as if they were still working it, but on a very small scale, was the same at Moel Tryfen Quarry, but that looked on a slightly larger scale. Local slate for local people?
I live opposite moel tryfen and they're deffinitley still working it, but on a small scale, you could be right maybe just supplying local people.
 

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