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Report - - Raf Broadwell. Carterton. Oxfordshire. April 2014 | Military Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk
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Report - Raf Broadwell. Carterton. Oxfordshire. April 2014

Vertigo

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#1
Whilst out for a walk I stumbled upon this place and had a mosey
Access is easy if you look
I also stumbled upon the carterton roc post nearby
Unfortunately I had to cut the visit short as I spotted the farmer speeding down the track towards me.

RAF Broadwell is a former Royal Air Force station located 2 miles north of Broadwell and 3 miles southeast of Burford, Oxfordshire, within 2 miles of RAF Brize Norton.

It opened on 15 November 1943 and closed on 31 March 1947, operating under RAF Transport Command. It consisted of 3 concrete runways in triangular configuration.

Broadwell took part in the D-Day assaults with nearby RAF Down Ampney and RAF Blakehill Farm. Broadwell had two such squadrons, No. 512 Squadron RAF and No. 575 Squadron RAF were based here, flying the Douglas Dakota.

In February 1944, No. 512 Squadron was transferred to No. 46 Group at RAF Broadwell, it was a tactical Dakota squadron and started training glider towing and parachute dropping. Its first operation in the new role was a leaflet drop on 5 June 1944 over France, this followed intensive flying in and out of France including dropping parachutists at Arnhem.

On the eve of D-Day No. 575 Squadron dropped 5 Para into the invasion drop zone. On 6 June, it towed 21 Horsa gliders into France. In the next few weeks it started a casualty evacuation service from France back to England. In September 1944, it was involved in operations at Arnhem where it suffered severe casualties.

The airfield continued to be a terminus for long-range transport operations to Europe, the Middle East and India. And closed in 1947.

The land is now purely used for farmland and only 1 runway the control tower and the roc post (welded and locked) remain today


Control tower in the distance

5D213DE5-170D-4BC1-8512-1B29D086535A_zpswh9ugwk5.jpg


One side of runway (public road intersects)

3D103EA5-C7D9-4113-B4A1-B5981B4E6EB1_zpsxpxlhlye.jpg


Other side

D4E7BB24-A4E0-493D-B437-1A6FBF3D503B_zpspvmkvrtp.jpg


On approach

C0B95995-A1E2-4CC7-8290-B37B208DC214_zpshgzssuos.jpg


Internal

D330064A-37A1-481C-8D35-D2D2E6CAC137_zpsdywiw8y0.jpg


Some great sentiments

4D8E1528-06A4-4B27-AB5D-DED3E8A195BF_zpsiucoveni.jpg


Stalagtites from the leaking roof

553E98E9-1F94-44C2-B5CA-C1830AC8ACB8_zps7fah68vu.jpg


Upper floor

626A3534-4F1A-426C-8FFD-61EFA4383828_zpsogmtoyhe.jpg


Roc post locked and welded

F03FFD97-C917-40FC-89BB-1790D9553DAD_zpslxgxmuz6.jpg


Roc vent

A3E125C8-C647-4B23-8460-8125AF381587_zpsbyot9i8j.jpg


Roc hatch (welded)

EDBDBE6F-50B3-49AD-8606-08E449EBDF41_zps31ieihp5.jpg


Unfortunately the atc control room has been demolished and the external stairs to the roof have long gone
But not bad exploring for a walk
Enjoy
 

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