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Report - RAF Ibsley Battle HQ and raid shelters


Sennaj

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
The BCHQ had a 360° view of the three runways of RAF Ibsley, being a defence towards any potential invasion. Armed with two Lewis AA guns and surrounding trenches with an unusual extension of a second cupola. Located East of the control tower and a km away from the HQ, Moyles Court house. The Battle Command HQ held a manned crew of around four officers and a group of airmen and runners (for if telephone lines were damaged).
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The Battle Command Headquarters:
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Office space:
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Steps leading to cupola
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View from cupola
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Inside Air raid shelter next to airfield:
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Shelter entrance:
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BCHQ escape hatch:
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Air raid protection next to Moyles HQ:
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One of three trenches on the hill:
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One of two AA placements:
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BCHQ entrance
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tigger

mog
Regular User
The BHQ (Battle Headquarters, no 'command' in their name) at Ibsley is a unique design and it's not known why it has the second smaller cuppola. A lot messier walls now :(

The thing you call 'air raid protection' is a Blast Shelter for 50 people. The idea is that it's open and the occupants can fire back at attackers.

There's an excellent website about BHQs which includes their history and purpose as well as photos/layout diagrams.
 

Calamity Jane

i see beauty in the unloved, places & things
Regular User
Some interesting bits there.:thumb Title needs county & date of explore though. Just for next time really.
 

Ordnance

Stay Safe
Moderator
RAF Ibsley in Hampshire was known as USAAF Station AAF-347 for security reasons by the USAAF during the war, and by which it was referred to instead of its location. Its USAAF Station Code was "IB".

The open top design of air raid shelter allowed for quicker access in the event of a surprise air attack and was an effective shelter other than a direct hit or near hit in regard to shrapnel, the ability to fire back was a minor consideration. They could be found in various designs at most RAF airfields.

The covered Stanton Shelter made from pre-fabucated concrete curved sections to deflect an aerial bomb afforded more protection from shrapnel were easy to enter but not much more protection from a direct hit, but to be honest no shelter really did.
 

Sennaj

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
RAF Ibsley in Hampshire was known as USAAF Station AAF-347 for security reasons by the USAAF during the war, and by which it was referred to instead of its location. Its USAAF Station Code was "IB".

The open top design of air raid shelter allowed for quicker access in the event of a surprise air attack and was an effective shelter other than a direct hit or near hit in regard to shrapnel, the ability to fire back was a minor consideration. They could be found in various designs at most RAF airfields.

The covered Stanton Shelter made from pre-fabucated concrete curved sections to deflect an aerial bomb afforded more protection from shrapnel were easy to enter but not much more protection from a direct hit, but to be honest no shelter really did.
Very interesting thanks! :)
 

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