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Trespassing and security quedtions | General Exploring Chat Forum | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Trespassing and security quedtions



ArtofDecay

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#1
As the title suggests, I'm looking for some information on the laws and regulations on different security and Trespassing stuff. I know there is the main Trespassing law thread but I had a few more questions I couldn't find answers to.
1. If a security guard is present, with a dog, is he allowed to release the dog? Just if the said trespasser is no causing any problems
2. Can you be fined on the spot or is there a warning to leave first?
3. If there is no fence surrounding property is it still illegal?
4. Likewise, if there are no signs?
5. Anyone ever spoke to security/owner and asked if you can have a look round? What's there usual answer?
That is all for now. Any help would be much appreciated because I need to get this cleared up, it kind of takes the fun away constantly overthinking.
 

obscurity

Flaxenation of the G!!!
Regular User
#2
there so much information available online and here on the forum that you really should be able to do your own research into the matter to answer your questions. It's simple really, at the end of the day if it is private property then you shouldn't be there and as such you have to expect some repercussions if your caught by a security guard or land owner. They are meant to use reasonable force but my idea of reasonable force can be different to yours. In this game you can expect to be beaten, bitten, threatened, locked into premises, arrested on suspicion of a list of various charges (even though usually released within 24 hours). We've even had a crossbow pulled on us and another occasion resulted in armed response from police. If your that bothered about the consequences vs the reward then your in the wrong game as you never know how one explore will vary to the next, there is no constant when it comes to humans, everyone reacts differently in different situations so all depends if you meet a decent security guy or police officer or a complete asshole.
 

ArtofDecay

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#3
Well fingers touch wood, ive been exploring for years now and never had anything close to what you've had or ever been caught. I'm not bothered about being caught it was more about the rights you have behind you to protect yourself. What happened to you with the crossbow?
 

ZerO81

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
#5
It's too vague a question as there are different laws for different countries and rather than relying on what is said on a forum, often by people not qualified to give out such advice (nothing against the posts already put here btw), you really should look at the vast amount of official advice available on the interweb.

Just because someone said it on here, does not mean it is true, plus regulations change and there is every chance information included on a forum is out of date.

Look for the information yourself from official resources as at the end of the day, any defense of "oh, that's what i was told on a forum" won't give you a leg to stand on in court.
 

JohnSmith

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#6
A few general rules I personally like to stick to:

Don't be an asshole to people you may bump into.

Don't damage or alter anything.

Stay away from power stations, live railway lines and active military sites.

Don't carry anything that can be interpreted as a weapon or tool.



Stick to those and you are generally ok.
 

Strøiis

Mr. Brightside
28DL Full Member
#7
Fixed further down in the thread
 
Last edited:

Oxygen Thief

Admin
Staff member
Admin
#8
1. If a security guard is present, with a dog, is he allowed to release the dog? Just if the said trespasser is no causing any problems

No they're not allowed to. But don't count on it.

2. Can you be fined on the spot or is there a warning to leave first?

What? That doesn't even make sense. Who's going to fine you and for what?

3. If there is no fence surrounding property is it still illegal?

Yes

4. Likewise, if there are no signs?

Yes

5. Anyone ever spoke to security/owner and asked if you can have a look round? What's there usual answer?

No, Health & Safety
 

The.Northern.Squad

Northern
28DL Full Member
#9
This is an extremely dumbed down version of the legislation on trespassing on civilian owned land

The police can charge under the criminal justice and public order act 1994 only if the trespassers;
  • have damaged the land; or
  • have used threatening, abusive or insulting behaviour to the occupier, the occupier's family, employees or agents; or
  • between them, they have 6 or more vehicles on the land.
Failure to obey a direction to leave or returning to the land as a trespasser within 3 months is an offence.

It is a criminal offence to trespass on railways and you will be subject to a fine if found.

It is a criminal offence under the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005 to trespass on a number of sites owned by the Ministry of Defence.
Here is a list of sites protected under criminal legislation

All of these sites are protected under the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005

Protected Ministry of Defence sites
HMNB Clyde
RNAD Coulport
Northwood Headquarters
RAF Flyingdales
RAF Menwith Hill
RAF Croughton
RAF Lakenheath
RAF Feltwell
RAF Mildenhall
RAF Brize Norton
SMC Marchwood
RAF Fairford
RAF Welford

Civil sites
Sellafield, Cumbria
Dounreay, Scotland
Capenhurst, near Chester
Drigg, near Sellafield
Harwell, near Oxford
Springfields, near Preston
Windscale, within Sellafield
Winfrith, near Wool in Dorset
GE Healthcare sites in Amersham and Cardiff
London University’s Imperial College of Science and Technology site in Ascot, Berkshire
Berkeley, near Bristol
Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre at Birniehill, East Kilbride

And the following nuclear power station sites:

Chapelcross, Dumfriesshire
Dungeness A and B, Kent
Hartlepool, near Middlesborough
Heysham 1 and 2, Lancashire
Hinkley Point A and B, Somerset
Hunterston A and B, Ayrshire
Oldbury, near Bristol
Sizewell A and B, Suffolk
Torness, East Lothian
Bradwell, Essex
Calder Hall, within Sellafield
Wylfa, on Anglesey
Trawsfynydd, Dolgellau, Wales

Defence sites:

Atomic Weapons Establishments sites near Aldermaston and Burghfield, Berkshire
Devonshire Dock Complex, Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria
Devonport Royal Dockyard, Plymouth
Rolls Royce Neptune site and Nuclear Fuel Production Plant in Derby
Rosyth Dockyard, Fife

There are probably more but I can't be fucked to research anymore

Sources:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publi...e-serious-organised-crime-and-police-act-2005
http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1994/33/contents
http://www.tl2000inquiry.org.uk/aspx/1037.aspx
http://www.nationalrail.co.uk/service_disruptions/80921.aspx
More detail please
 

Strøiis

Mr. Brightside
28DL Full Member
#13
just write out the whole thing again, not good enough
Better? @The.Northern.Squad

In the United Kingdom trespass on the most part is considered a civil offence.

It is up to the landowner to press charges, the Crown itself won't. The landowner, the landowner's agents or the police under direction from the landowner have the right to remove trespassers from their property using reasonable force.

It is against the law to trespass on any land (and inland that includes land covered by water such as rivers or lakes) or in any building. Ignorance of that fact is no defence under this law.

Any person can enter a place if the landowners permit it. However, this does not necessarily make a permanent right of access.. Unless they have dedicated a bit of land to be permanently open.
It is within the power of the landowner to ask any person to leave, assuming that person does not have some other lawful reason to be there.

If the person does not go immediately, by the shortest practical route, then they are trespassing.
Despite the well-known sign ‘trespassers will be prosecuted’, trespass is not a criminal offence and trespassers cannot usually be prosecuted.


Sometimes, people go onto private property, such as woodland. Which is not apparently fenced off and where the owners do not seem to mind. The fact that there is no fence or no sign saying that the land is private does not mean that people can go there. Wandering on to farmers fields or other places which are obviously private is clearly trespassing, but so is wandering over land which may not be so clearly private, if the public has no right of access.

Never ever cause damage to gain entry to a property. If there is no obvious access points, then give it up and leave at once Even accidental damage will be considered an offence. Don't take tools with you on an explore. If caught with them, you will be seen as "going equipped".

In the event of being caught on private property by the owner, or by a representative, Leave immediately by the shortest possible route. Don't use violent/threatening behaviour towards them. Don't make matters worse for yourself by arguing with the person(s) Never take item(s) from an exploration site. This can be counted as theft, and will lead to a more serious matter.

The police can charge under the criminal justice and public order act 1994 only if the trespassers;

  • have damaged the land; or
  • have used threatening, abusive or insulting behaviour to the occupier, the occupier's family, employees or agents; or
  • Between them, they have 6 or more vehicles on the land.
Basically, listen to the landowner and don't be a twat and you'll be on the right side of the law and don't bring a stupid amount of vehicles.

There are a number of sites which are protected by law for the safety of the public and the countries infrastructure, this includes a number of MOD owned sites and all railways both disused and used.

Here is a list of all sites protected under the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005

LqkK2wX.png


Sources:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publi...e-serious-organised-crime-and-police-act-2005
http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1994/33/contents
http://www.tl2000inquiry.org.uk/aspx/1037.aspx
http://www.nationalrail.co.uk/service_disruptions/80921.aspx
http://chewy.cc/urbex-law.html
http://www.cps.gov.uk/legal/s_to_u/trespass_and_nuisance_on_land/
 

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Last edited:

The.Northern.Squad

Northern
28DL Full Member
#14

Better? @The.Northern.Squad

In the United Kingdom trespass on the most part is considered a civil offence.

It is up to the landowner to press charges, the Crown itself won't. The landowner, the landowner's agents or the police under direction from the landowner have the right to remove trespassers from their property using reasonable force.

It is against the law to trespass on any land (and inland that includes land covered by water such as rivers or lakes) or in any building. Ignorance of that fact is no defence under this law.

Any person can enter a place if the landowners permit it. However, this does not necessarily make a permanent right of access.. Unless they have dedicated a bit of land to be permanently open.
It is within the power of the landowner to ask any person to leave, assuming that person does not have some other lawful reason to be there.

If the person does not go immediately, by the shortest practical route, then they are trespassing.
Despite the well-known sign ‘trespassers will be prosecuted’, trespass is not a criminal offence and trespassers cannot usually be prosecuted.


Sometimes, people go onto private property, such as woodland. Which is not apparently fenced off and where the owners do not seem to mind. The fact that there is no fence or no sign saying that the land is private does not mean that people can go there. Wandering on to farmers fields or other places which are obviously private is clearly trespassing, but so is wandering over land which may not be so clearly private, if the public has no right of access.

Never ever cause damage to gain entry to a property. If there is no obvious access points, then give it up and leave at once Even accidental damage will be considered an offence. Don't take tools with you on an explore. If caught with them, you will be seen as "going equipped".

In the event of being caught on private property by the owner, or by a representative, Leave immediately by the shortest possible route. Don't use violent/threatening behaviour towards them. Don't make matters worse for yourself by arguing with the person(s) Never take item(s) from an exploration site. This can be counted as theft, and will lead to a more serious matter.

The police can charge under the criminal justice and public order act 1994 only if the trespassers;

  • have damaged the land; or
  • have used threatening, abusive or insulting behaviour to the occupier, the occupier's family, employees or agents; or
  • Between them, they have 6 or more vehicles on the land.
Basically, listen to the landowner and don't be a twat and you'll be on the right side of the law and don't bring a stupid amount of vehicles.

There are a number of sites which are protected by law for the safety of the public and the countries infrastructure, this includes a number of MOD owned sites and all railways both disused and used.

Here is a list of all sites protected under the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005

LqkK2wX.png


Sources:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publi...e-serious-organised-crime-and-police-act-2005
http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1994/33/contents
http://www.tl2000inquiry.org.uk/aspx/1037.aspx
http://www.nationalrail.co.uk/service_disruptions/80921.aspx
http://chewy.cc/urbex-law.html
http://www.cps.gov.uk/legal/s_to_u/trespass_and_nuisance_on_land/
Haha didnt think you actually would, Ill remember next time if I for some reason want an alternative to google in human form
 

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The Lone Ranger

Safety is paramount!
Staff member
Moderator
#15
Getting caught is the issue, there are ways to make it less likely. However it still doesn't guarantee you won't get caught.

Time, size of group, pre-inspection of a site or just spending 30 minutes watching it, working out suitable access as well as alternative exits, safer areas of the site to visit, awareness of pig's, camera's and nosey neighbours. Where you park up, how you look - rucksack and tripod near a derelict site with security rings alarm bells.

Not rocket science, but having watched groups trying and getting caught even going into easy sites there seems to be plenty of spacemen/women out there :D
 

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