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Report - - Gros Ouvrage Latiremont (Maginot Line), France - May 2017 | European and International Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk
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Report - Gros Ouvrage Latiremont (Maginot Line), France - May 2017

The_Raw

28DL Regular User
Regular User
#1
The Maginot Line, named after the French Minister of War André Maginot, was a line of concrete fortifications, obstacles, and weapon installations built by France in the 1930s to deter invasion by Germany. It was constructed along the borders with Switzerland, Germany, and Luxembourg. Ouvrage translates as "works" in English: published documents in both English and French refer to these fortifications in this manner, rather than as "forts". An ouvrage typically consists of a series of concrete-encased strongpoints on the surface, linked by underground tunnels with common underground works (shops, barracks, and factories etc.). Constructions started in the early 1930s. They served during the Second World War, and were often reused during the Cold War before being gradually abandoned by the French army.

Ouvrage Latiremont is a gros (large) ouvrage of the Maginot Line, located in the Fortified Sector of the Crusnes, sub-sector of Arrancy. It lies between the gros ouvrage Fermont and the petit ouvrage Mauvais Bois, facing Belgium. More than 1,200 metres (3,900 ft) of underground galleries connect the entries to the farthest block, at an average depth of 30 metres (98 ft). The gallery system was served by a narrow-gauge (60 cm) railway that continued out of the ammunition entrance and connected to a regional military railway system for the movement of material along the front a few kilometres to the rear. Several "stations" along the gallery system, located in wider sections of gallery, permitted trains to pass or be stored. The 1940 manning of the ouvrage under the command of Commandant Pophillat comprised 21 officers and 580 men of the 149th Fortress Infantry Regiment.

Latiremont was active in 1939-1940, coming under direct attack in late June 1940. From September 1939 to June 1940, Latiremont fired 14,452 75mm rounds and 4,234 81mm rounds at German forces and in support of neighbouring units. It was not until June 1940 that Latiremont and Fermont were directly attacked by the German 161st Division, which brought 21 cm howitzers and 30.5 cm mortars on 21 June. By this time, German units were moving in the rear of the Line, cutting power and communications. Heavy fire repelled attacks but Latiremont's garrison surrendered to the Germans on 27 June 1940.

After renovations during the Cold War, it was abandoned.

This was the first of 3 gros ouvrages I visited with @elliot5200, @Maniac, and @extreme_ironing. Also good to hook up with @Gromr123 who happened to be nearby on this occasion. Photos can't quite convey how large it is in here, 1.5km from one end to the other. We only saw a portion of it due to time constrictions, but you could easily spend a whole day in here.

1.
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2.
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3.
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4. Some amazing blast doors down here
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5.
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6.
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7. Workshop with a lathe inside
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8. Remains of a kitchen
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9. Shower block
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10.
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11.
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12. Blast door inside one of the attack blocks on the surface
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13.Some rusty gun machinery still in situ
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14.
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15.
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16.
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17. Another epic blast door
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18.
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19.
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20. Engine Room
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21.
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22.
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23.
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24. Train station for bringing in materials, the platform on the left
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25.
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26. <3 this door
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27.
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28.
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Cheers for looking :thumb
 

Grom

Recovering Fisheye-aholic
Regular User
#7
Those photos came out a bit good didn't they! This was a total blast to explore. 4 hours underground wasn't even close to enough time to see all the good bits.

Was awesome meeting all of you!