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Information - - Access to Abandoned Mines in the UK | Mines and Quarries | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Information - Access to Abandoned Mines in the UK


CaverPete

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Hi all. Following on from the recent post about Mandale Mine, I thought some information about the legal status of old mines and why they are often locked/gated would be a benefit to post on it's own thread.

I am currently the volunteer Projects Officer for the Derbyshire Caving Association. I deal with helping landowners comply with their legal responsibilities surrounding mines on their land, whilst maintaining access for explorers. Most of you here are fully aware of the local caving associations around the UK and how to access sites legitimately, but there are more and more people being attracted to old mines and caves who may not have ever encountered 'proper' mine explorer communities online or in the flesh, and so may not be aware of how things sometimes have to be done in order to maintain access to these sites for all.
The Derbyshire Caving Association has seen an increase in the number of sites with gates being broken into over the last few years. The DCA is not the cave/mine police, nor do we seek to restrict access to these places for the special few, quite the opposite. We work as volunteers with landowners to prevent them permanently sealing sites and offer to gate sites for public safety so long as explorer access is maintained. In many cases this is as simple as replacing a grill over the hole or using an adjustable spanner to let yourself in. In some cases a combination code or key needs to be obtained, which is something we try to avoid as it does require some pre-planning for visits, but we don't impose any restrictions on giving that out, so long as the landowner has not forced us to.
DCA don't care if you are from a caving background or an urbex one, you are all legitimate explorers as far as we are concerned and we are asking for your help in keeping these sites open for the future. By taking the time to Google the mine you wish to visit, or look for access info on the regional caving association or mine history group website, we all stand a far better chance of maintain access to these mines in the future.
There are details of the DCA on our website: https://thedca.org.uk/
There is a longer document explaining why mines need to remain secured that I have written which I would suggest is worth reading and possibly sharing to other groups you use. I have attached it to this post and it is also on the Derbyshire Caving Association website here: https://thedca.org.uk/images/dca/news/Access to secured mines in Derbyshire.pdf

If you need any help with accessing a site in the Peak District area, you should feel free to contact the DCA. You do not need to be a member or give us any money for help / information!
I can only speak for my region, but you can find help and information for all parts of the UK by Googling the local caving association or mine history group for your area.

Mandale Aqueduct Gate (2).JPG
 

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