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Report - - Hatfield Colliery - One more time. - October 2015 | Industrial Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk
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Report - Hatfield Colliery - One more time. - October 2015

Joe.

28DL Regular User
Regular User
#1
I've been visiting Hatfield Colliery since 2005 I'd come to think of it as the pit they couldn’t kill, Its survived the ravages of closures, privatiastion, sale and adminstartion and each time it has been resurrected. In the ten years I have been visiting I have seen the pit derelict, Recomissioned, reopened and now Sadly derelict again. This time though its permanent the shafts have been backfilled, The phoenix will not rise from the ashes.

The current mining operation ended abruptly this summer, with no contracted buyer for their coal the government backed out of promised financial support. The closure came overnight with little warning and in an instant the years of hard work reopening Hatfield were thrown away, Yet another wasted pit to pile upon the spoil heap that has become the legacy of British coal.

In the last 10 years we have steadily been loosing the last of the pits, now there is practically nothing left to loose. The recent closures have been the final insult, years of decline has led the industry to this point. When Big K winds its last coal in December that will be It. There will be no more deep coal. The industry that fuelled the Britain’s Industrial greatness will have been laid to rest. Few will notice fewer still will care.

The recent story of mine closures has been a tale of obliteration, At Welbeck, Harworth, Maltby, Daw Mill and Rossington scarcely a structure remains that could tell the tale of the work that for years provided the essential fuel for the nation. Work for entire communities; pride, purpose, pit.

The demolition has been total our history has been scoured from the landscape, leaving a sanitised void in the communities that once surrounded them. 30 years on and it feels like the aftermath of the miner’s strike continues to play out. The monuments of the working class are being torn down. Civic leaders may boast of preserved winding wheels and static monuments. Perhaps its just me but these shollow symbols seem to be an insult to the power and spirit of the pit they are supposed to represent.

In this enviromental age few will weep for king coal, but a few dedicated followers will shed a silent tear for the last of the pits. This is our collective history and it deserves to be remembered. When its gone there will be nothing left.

These photos are not the comprehensive history of my time at Hatfield, I shall save that post for another day. They do however capture the essence of the Mining industry in 2015. Appreciate it while you can.

Promises unforefilled:

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Pit Yard:

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Powerhall,

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Downcast Headstock, From the Upcast Heapstead,

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On the Upcast:

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Whiskey Shared,

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Rope Wrecked gaurds,

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The last Coal stocks

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dweeb

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
#2
Don't you think it looks very sparse around the head gear, when you think of all the buildings that have gone.

I agree with your sentiment, I got to spend a fair bit of time there one day in 2006 and the guys there were full of optimism about the future of the pit. It's quite sad to think it never filled it's potential.

I honestly don't think anybody in power feels they are doing anything wrong by the piece meal demolition of the remaining coal structures, hell even the ones that were deemed worthy of listing in the 1990's / 2000's are loathed by the majority.

But hey, we have Caphouse as an 'example', so it's all OK right...?
 

Dave W

Industrial Pornographer
Regular User
#6
Pretty cool. No sign of the mongrels?
About six of them running around. Why let that keep you from headstocks? :p
At least they were roaming/patrolling outside, and not kipped up inside the bath house like thoresby...
 

ACID- REFLUX

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#8
Top stuff mate very nice work :thumb
As you say end of an era ; (. But it outlived all of our local still productive Pits by a long way

We didn't have issue with the Dogs. Just the Rapid Dog handler ;)
 

scotty markfour

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#11
excellent report n pics , really gives you an impression of its former glory , the shot of you on top of the winding gear with your NCB donkey jacket expresses your fond memories of the place and the regrets for a once great place ! ...thanks for sharing
 

Joe.

28DL Regular User
Regular User
#15
The local council are now calling the shots on site and they had been trying to get the whole lot demolished as soon as possible in the name of making the site "safe." A Demolition contractor was booked to start at the beginning of November.

At the 11th hour though the headstocks have been listed! think that came as a bit of a shock to the council who preferred the idea of some tasteful* preserved pitwheels instead of whole headstocks.

The winding house and power hall are not included and may still be demolished soon. We'll have to wait and see, I hope they stay as they provide vital context for the Heapstead area and without them the site will look very sparse.
 

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