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Report - - Mapperley Tunnel (February 2020) | Underground Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Mapperley Tunnel (February 2020)


Doug Judy

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
A fairly in-depth look at Mapperley Tunnel..

A brief history..

At 1,132 yards, the longest of the tunnels in the area by some distance penetrated a ridge to the north-west of Gedling, approached through a cutting 70 feet in depth which was crossed by a brick aqueduct. Mapperley Tunnel’s construction was expedited by sinking six shafts, steam engines being deployed at each for hoisting up the spoil. This was then taken away to form a nearby embankment. Three of the shafts were subsequently retained as ventilators. Track level was 210 feet below ground at its deepest point.
As is to be expected, attending the work was a catalogue of misadventure - minor, major and fatal. Here’s a random sample. Miner Charles Daniels was crushed to death by a fall of earth in February 1874. In July of the same year, a lad named Shepperton suffered a severely crushed hand. Two months later, William Tucker was taken to hospital with smashed hand and badly cut head after some bind fell on him. And a lump of rock landed on 24-year-old navvy George Longthorn in August 1875, causing serious back injuries.On 23rd January 1925, a collapse triggered by mining subsidence brought down a 12-yard section of roof, blocking the line with around 150 tonnes of debris. Whilst repairs were carried out, traffic was diverted along the Nottingham Suburban Railway which took a roughly parallel course further to the west. The tunnel was repaired but the continuing effects of subsidence resulted in the imposition of speed restrictions during the 1950s. Closure came on 4th April 1960. Today the west portal is buried and the tunnel backfilled for a distance of 510 yards, as far as the centre shaft. This - with its tower of tipped rubbish - and the eastern shaft remain open; the other is capped and located under the drive of a new house off Gedling Road. The shaft linings are supported on cast iron curbs, inserted into the arch. The east portal is an imposing brick structure although it looks rather lost at the end of the vast cutting. It comprises two substantial buttresses either side of the entrance and an unusually high headwall. The copings are ashlar, as is the projecting keystone. Exhibited by the arch face are ten brick rings, needed to withstand the ground forces being exerted on the tunnel.

So to the explore... this images are made up over several visits and we even ventured beyond the infill and reached Air Shaft No.4 as yet we’ve not gone beyond this but it is possible I think... I’ll let the images below explain the rest..

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looking west from under Air Shaft No.1



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looking west under Air Shaft No.2.

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Same image as above but with no light other than from th


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looking east under Air Shaft No.2


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Same as above slightly more light...

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Looking up Air Shaft No.1.

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Infilled section beyond the crap stack looking east Air Shaft 4 just visible


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the view from the start of the infill


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looking towards the crap stack 455yds in from west entrance..


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Looking west unsure of exact spot...


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Another 420 yds in looking


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350y


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just make out the only remaining Railway sleepers in the ground on the right hand


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One of many refuges

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Some railway fish plates and one for the drainage grates

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Eastern portal..


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The famous crap stack, taken from top on infill.

Well that’s all for now, hope you’ve enjoyed looking through these, and maybe of some reference to you...

Thanks
 

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Calamity Jane

i see beauty in the unloved, places & things
Regular User
Tunnels get underestimated as an explore, but a few on here, make them seen, and that a skill. The colours, shapes, and lighting all make for a nice report. Good history too :thumb
 

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