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Report - - Meanwood Park Hospital Mansion, Leeds - January 2019 | Asylums and Hospitals | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Meanwood Park Hospital Mansion, Leeds - January 2019



The Lone Ranger

Safety is paramount!
Staff member
Moderator
Meanwood Park Hospital Mansion - Leeds

Meanwood 4.jpg


A Brief History

Meanwood Hall is a grade II listed building. It was built about 1762 for Thomas Denison, extended in 1814 for Joseph Lees, and further developed in 1834 for Christopher Beckett. In 1919 it was bought by the city council to form the nucleus of Meanwood Park Hospital which accommodated men, women and children with learning disabilities. It served the city of Leeds and other areas of the West Riding of Yorkshire, and at its maximum extent in the 1960s had 841 beds. After the hospital closed in 1997, part of the hall was converted to housing, and further housing developments now fill the hospital grounds

In August 1989 Meanwood Park Hospital, Leeds, was the biggest hospital for mental handicap in the Yorkshire Health Region, set in parkland of 134 acres, which had been the hospital's estate, and has existed for over 200 years,

Considered to be “Admirably situated for its purpose in a secluded position” with “land pleasantly wooded, slopes gently to the South and surrounded on all sides by a fine belt of trees affording both protection and privacy.” The great advantage of Meanwood Park Hospital (MPH) was its situation only four miles from the centre of Leeds. It always provided for the Leeds conurbation. In addition, at different times, it served Huddersfield and parts of West Yorkshire extending to the border with Lancashire. During the '60s it was the main hospital for a population of 1,200,000.

The Woodlea estate was built in 1998, on land which previously housed the Meanwood Park Hospital. As part of the community contributions package, the circular pathway and surrounding woodland were to be maintained. However, the developer went into liquidation a few years later.

My Visit

A bit of a magical mystery tour tour, but down to me being late in the first place. One of my pet hates is arranging a time to meet and the other person not turning up, for once it was me who was late and by the time I got close to the meeting point everyone else had set off. I had no idea where they were heading, but at least I'd been given a pin on Google maps. The drive there was a nightmare, turned out if I'd gone direct from home it was just 40 minutes drive, but with my detour it turned to be closer to 2 hours. I didn't even know what the place was when I turned up, just glad of the invite and see somewhere I'd not been to before.

Just about to enter the building and a nice dog walker stopped for a chat, usual talk about what a shame such a beautiful building had stood to rot for 20+ years, trouble with youth and other people entering the building without permission, etc. I assured her that our safety survey of the structure would highlight any structural concerns as well as any security issues on site. She walked away happy in the knowledge that some professionals were on site and her concerns would be addressed. I was in the building before she'd gone out of site :thumb

Once inside you could tell that this had been a very grand building, never mind it being part of a hospital. Time hasn't effected it too bad structurally, however there isn't much left inside these days. Even in the last couple of months looking at other people photos, things have either gone or been moved.

meanwood 8.jpg


Meanwood 9.jpg


What did make this building well worth the visit was the staircase, one of the nicest I've seen in a long time.

Meanwood.jpg


No matter how hard I tried, I could not get a perfectly symmetrical image, I have a feeling the stairs have suffered a bit of distortion over the years and a couple of additional supports had been installed in the past.

Meanwood 6.jpg


Meanwood 7.jpg


Bit more stair porn.

Meanwood 3.jpg


The roof was also pretty stunning above the stair well, nothing a lick of paint couldn't sort out.

Meanwood 2.jpg


All in all a nice mooch and was good to finally catch up with some mates.

Cheers,

TLR.​
 

tarkovsky

feeling drained?
Regular User
Lovely pics. I nearly went here the other day when I was in the area but opted for drains instead. Kind of wishing I’d gone to see those stairs now, but never mind.
 

Yvette

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Meanwood Park Hospital Mansion - Leeds

View attachment 791510

A Brief History

Meanwood Hall is a grade II listed building. It was built about 1762 for Thomas Denison, extended in 1814 for Joseph Lees, and further developed in 1834 for Christopher Beckett. In 1919 it was bought by the city council to form the nucleus of Meanwood Park Hospital which accommodated men, women and children with learning disabilities. It served the city of Leeds and other areas of the West Riding of Yorkshire, and at its maximum extent in the 1960s had 841 beds. After the hospital closed in 1997, part of the hall was converted to housing, and further housing developments now fill the hospital grounds

In August 1989 Meanwood Park Hospital, Leeds, was the biggest hospital for mental handicap in the Yorkshire Health Region, set in parkland of 134 acres, which had been the hospital's estate, and has existed for over 200 years,

Considered to be “Admirably situated for its purpose in a secluded position” with “land pleasantly wooded, slopes gently to the South and surrounded on all sides by a fine belt of trees affording both protection and privacy.” The great advantage of Meanwood Park Hospital (MPH) was its situation only four miles from the centre of Leeds. It always provided for the Leeds conurbation. In addition, at different times, it served Huddersfield and parts of West Yorkshire extending to the border with Lancashire. During the '60s it was the main hospital for a population of 1,200,000.

The Woodlea estate was built in 1998, on land which previously housed the Meanwood Park Hospital. As part of the community contributions package, the circular pathway and surrounding woodland were to be maintained. However, the developer went into liquidation a few years later.

My Visit

A bit of a magical mystery tour tour, but down to me being late in the first place. One of my pet hates is arranging a time to meet and the other person not turning up, for once it was me who was late and by the time I got close to the meeting point everyone else had set off. I had no idea where they were heading, but at least I'd been given a pin on Google maps. The drive there was a nightmare, turned out if I'd gone direct from home it was just 40 minutes drive, but with my detour it turned to be closer to 2 hours. I didn't even know what the place was when I turned up, just glad of the invite and see somewhere I'd not been to before.

Just about to enter the building and a nice dog walker stopped for a chat, usual talk about what a shame such a beautiful building had stood to rot for 20+ years, trouble with youth and other people entering the building without permission, etc. I assured her that our safety survey of the structure would highlight any structural concerns as well as any security issues on site. She walked away happy in the knowledge that some professionals were on site and her concerns would be addressed. I was in the building before she'd gone out of site :thumb

Once inside you could tell that this had been a very grand building, never mind it being part of a hospital. Time hasn't effected it too bad structurally, however there isn't much left inside these days. Even in the last couple of months looking at other people photos, things have either gone or been moved.

View attachment 791513

View attachment 791514

What did make this building well worth the visit was the staircase, one of the nicest I've seen in a long time.

View attachment 791515

No matter how hard I tried, I could not get a perfectly symmetrical image, I have a feeling the stairs have suffered a bit of distortion over the years and a couple of additional supports had been installed in the past.

View attachment 791511

View attachment 791512

Bit more stair porn.

View attachment 791509

The roof was also pretty stunning above the stair well, nothing a lick of paint couldn't sort out.

View attachment 791508

All in all a nice mooch and was good to finally catch up with some mates.

Cheers,

TLR.​
Very nice stair are lovely photos
 

lauren666

28DL Member
28DL Member
Meanwood Park Hospital Mansion - Leeds

View attachment 791510

A Brief History

Meanwood Hall is a grade II listed building. It was built about 1762 for Thomas Denison, extended in 1814 for Joseph Lees, and further developed in 1834 for Christopher Beckett. In 1919 it was bought by the city council to form the nucleus of Meanwood Park Hospital which accommodated men, women and children with learning disabilities. It served the city of Leeds and other areas of the West Riding of Yorkshire, and at its maximum extent in the 1960s had 841 beds. After the hospital closed in 1997, part of the hall was converted to housing, and further housing developments now fill the hospital grounds

In August 1989 Meanwood Park Hospital, Leeds, was the biggest hospital for mental handicap in the Yorkshire Health Region, set in parkland of 134 acres, which had been the hospital's estate, and has existed for over 200 years,

Considered to be “Admirably situated for its purpose in a secluded position” with “land pleasantly wooded, slopes gently to the South and surrounded on all sides by a fine belt of trees affording both protection and privacy.” The great advantage of Meanwood Park Hospital (MPH) was its situation only four miles from the centre of Leeds. It always provided for the Leeds conurbation. In addition, at different times, it served Huddersfield and parts of West Yorkshire extending to the border with Lancashire. During the '60s it was the main hospital for a population of 1,200,000.

The Woodlea estate was built in 1998, on land which previously housed the Meanwood Park Hospital. As part of the community contributions package, the circular pathway and surrounding woodland were to be maintained. However, the developer went into liquidation a few years later.

My Visit

A bit of a magical mystery tour tour, but down to me being late in the first place. One of my pet hates is arranging a time to meet and the other person not turning up, for once it was me who was late and by the time I got close to the meeting point everyone else had set off. I had no idea where they were heading, but at least I'd been given a pin on Google maps. The drive there was a nightmare, turned out if I'd gone direct from home it was just 40 minutes drive, but with my detour it turned to be closer to 2 hours. I didn't even know what the place was when I turned up, just glad of the invite and see somewhere I'd not been to before.

Just about to enter the building and a nice dog walker stopped for a chat, usual talk about what a shame such a beautiful building had stood to rot for 20+ years, trouble with youth and other people entering the building without permission, etc. I assured her that our safety survey of the structure would highlight any structural concerns as well as any security issues on site. She walked away happy in the knowledge that some professionals were on site and her concerns would be addressed. I was in the building before she'd gone out of site :thumb

Once inside you could tell that this had been a very grand building, never mind it being part of a hospital. Time hasn't effected it too bad structurally, however there isn't much left inside these days. Even in the last couple of months looking at other people photos, things have either gone or been moved.

View attachment 791513

View attachment 791514

What did make this building well worth the visit was the staircase, one of the nicest I've seen in a long time.

View attachment 791515

No matter how hard I tried, I could not get a perfectly symmetrical image, I have a feeling the stairs have suffered a bit of distortion over the years and a couple of additional supports had been installed in the past.

View attachment 791511

View attachment 791512

Bit more stair porn.

View attachment 791509

The roof was also pretty stunning above the stair well, nothing a lick of paint couldn't sort out.

View attachment 791508

All in all a nice mooch and was good to finally catch up with some mates.

Cheers,

TLR.​
oh my god im actually in love with this place. what camera did you use? amazing pictures im so jealous
 

The Lone Ranger

Safety is paramount!
Staff member
Moderator
oh my god im actually in love with this place. what camera did you use? amazing pictures im so jealous
Thank you, unfortunately a local graffiti artist decided to tag all the walls in the stairwell last weekend, not even with good tags. Now looking a bit sorry for its self :(

The photos were taken with a Canon 5D mk iv and an 11-24mm /F 4,0 EF L USM Lens, a lovely combination for exploring :thumb
 

hamtagger

28DL Regular User
Regular User
Nice report mate - it didn't take long for the furniture to vanish, the shot below was only in December '18!
IMG_7674.jpg
 

Qwertypolk

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
We had a look at this over the weekend, seems pretty recently re-secured unless we missed something. I'm not surprised, it's practically in people's front gardens
 

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