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Report - - RFA Sir Tristram -- Portland Harbour, Dorset -- August 2014 | Military Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - RFA Sir Tristram -- Portland Harbour, Dorset -- August 2014


Sunnyy

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Some History

RFA Sir Tristram L3505 is a Landing Ship Logistics of the Round Table class. She was launched in 1966, and accepted into British Army service in 1967.

Tristram-280275025.jpg

Photo courtesy of Wikipedia


The Round Table Class, named after The Knights of the Round Table, was a British ship class designed for amphibious warfare missions in support of the main
amphibious warfare ships. Sir Tristram had bow doors leading onto the main vehicle deck, making it roll-on/roll-off, combined with ramps that led to
upper and lower vehicle decks. Thanks to its shallow draught, it could beach itself and use the bow doors for speedy unloading of troops and
equipment. The ship also had helicopter decks on both the upper vehicle deck and behind the superstructure.


DPFP010-01.jpg
RFA Sir Tristram at WB Bay.jpg

Photos courtesy of Wikipedia


In April 1982 RFA Sir Tristram was diverted from Belize to the Falkland Islands to take part in the British effort to retake the Falkland Islands.
On 8 June that year, while transporting men and equipment, the ship was attacked by A-4 Skyhawks from the Argentine Air Force, each loaded with three 500 lb
Mark 82 bombs.


a9cf547616c86f865183b11ab53392f7.jpg
DAln0lhXcAEOhyS.jpg

Photos courtesy of Wikipedia


At approximately 14:00 local time the decks were strafed and two crew were killed. A 500 lb bomb penetrated the deck, but failed to explode
immediately, allowing the remaining crew to be evacuated. Following the later explosion, Sir Tristram was abandoned.

Immediately following the end of the conflict, the ship was towed to Port Stanley, where she was used as an accommodation ship. Sir Tristram
then returned to the United Kingdom in 1983 on a heavy lift ship and was extensively rebuilt.


RFA_Sir_Tristram_&_MV_Dan_Lifter_late_1982.jpg

Photo courtesy of Wikipedia


Following the rebuild, the ship re-entered active service in 1985, and saw service in the Gulf War, and the Balkan conflicts of the 1990s. The ship supported
relief operations for Hurricane Mitch off Central America, then in 2000 the ship was deployed to Sierra Leone in support of British operations there, followed
by a cruise to the Baltic Sea in support of Mine Counter Measure Vessels. Early 2001 saw Sir Tristram return to Sierra Leone to take over from Sir Percivale as
the ship supporting British forces ashore there. In 2003 the ship was deployed as part of the largest British fleet for 20 years in support of the invasion of Iraq.

Sir Tristram was decommissioned on 17 December 2005 and permanently moored in Portland Harbour, Dorset. She continues to be used for training purposes by
the Special Boat Service and other elements of UK Special Forces Group.


20140601_154937.jpg



On a warm summers day in August 2014, me and a few friends visiting Dorset decided we were going to paddle out to this ship and see if we
could get on it. I had previously read a rumour post about Sir Tristram, and this sparked my interest. To this day I have never seen another post about
the ship, so either no one else has been on it, or they just haven't made a report.

I've stalled doing this report for years, out of laziness and perhaps a little disappointment that the pictures weren't as good as they could have been.
For an average camera phone with a poor light, and an LED Lenser, stashed in a dry bag in 2014, I suppose they were okay.


20140608_145216.jpg



We took our two kayaks, rented for two hours from Chesil beach, and paddled toward the ship. It took around 40 minutes to get there.

This was, and still is, the most enjoyable adventure I've ever had.


20140608_154814.jpg


You don't realise how huge the ship is until you get close to it.

20140608_150343.jpg




20140608_150604.jpg



No access through this rear door.


20140608_152422.jpg



The ship has a permanent landing platform attached to the side. The gate on the stairs was easy to climb around. Getting aboard was no trouble.

The only issue was 40 minutes paddling there meant 40 minutes paddling back, so that meant we only had 40 minutes to wander around the ship.

This was not enough.

I returned to the ship a few weeks later on a kayak rented for half a day.


20140608_152307.jpg




20140608_153631.jpg



Front and rear of the ship. In the distance you can an active Navy ship. They are often moored in the harbor.

After doing this explore my brother, who was with me on the second trip, but decided to catch makeral rather than explore an old naval ship, :oops:
said that his colleague at his school was saying that the Special Boat Service will give you hell if they catch you on there. Something about
detaining you for so many hours/days under anti terrorism charges.


20140608_152759.jpg



The rear of the ship with some kind of walkway. Perhaps for training to jump in the sea. It was pretty high. I should have jumped!
Cheesy titanic pic, but I couldn't resist.



20140608_152606.jpg



Rear of the ship from the end of the platform.


20140608_153509.jpg



Inside the ships control room. This was accessible on the first visit, but then sealed up on the second.


20140608_153529.jpg




20140608_153543.jpg




20140608_153423.jpg




20140608_153621.jpg



Despite some decay, the ship was in well maintained state.


Time for a wander.


20140824_114111.jpg



The ship had four zones. Red, Yellow, Blue, and Green. Red appeared to be the above deck areas.


20140824_112824.jpg



Dining areas, then the kitchen. The kitchen was all decked out in stainless steel, with zero windows or natural light, low ceilings, and a variety of
fryers, ovens, hobs, and microwaves. Combine that with the swaying motion of a ship at sea and I bet it was the worst place to be a chef.


20140824_113015.jpg




20140824_113037.jpg




20140824_113055.jpg



After the kitchen areas I found the hallway after hallway of mostly empty rooms. I imagine these would have been the living accommodation.

821721




821722




821723


Keys to all the unlocked doors.


20140608_153041.jpg


All toilets and sinks filled with expanding foam.

See extremely polite British sign on the wall--

'This vacuum system is easily blocked. Only the arisings from bodily processes and the associated paperwork are to be deposited in this w.c/urinal.'

:D


Part 2 pictures coming up...
 
Last edited:

Sunnyy

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
A few pictures below deck. It was so huge I didn't get chance to walk it all. it was also eerily quiet and creaky.
I didn't get many pictures due to it being totally dark.

821750


821746
821749





821745



Rear door of the ship as pictured from the outside in an earlier photo.


821747




821744


A smoke grenade?


821754


There were a few rooms full of spare parts for the ship.

821755




821756


Electricity room? Thinking back, my one regret is not making it to the engine room.


Now for the funny pictures....

Supplies for the fire party....

821748


And it seems like they often had weapons training in the ship, using paint balls. there was evidence of this pretty much everywhere.

The bit I most enjoyed was the targets I found....


821743




821751




821752




821753



Great stuff.


Time to get out of here.


821757



Hope you enjoyed the ship. If you real want to see a little more I found a short video of me wandering around.
First half is okay and second half is a bit dark as its below deck.

 

DodgyDorset

28DL Member
28DL Member
I'm based in Weymouth and did this exact same explore as you! Was easily the best Kayak and explore I've done!

When I went on the ship, it seemed like the center of the boat had been hollowed out and they had built wooden rooms for SBS training to go in and clear out like classic entry, flashbang, shoot style.

One thing I guess you didn't notice was the pallet and wooden crate filled with Burka's!? They also use live rounds on the ship with hard coloured pink/blue bullets. We found hundreds of empty cartridges everywhere.

Such an interesting ship and great to read your story and see your pictures!
 

Sunnyy

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Great! Glad to hear someone else managed to get out there and experience it.

Yeah now you've reminded me, i do remember the wooden rooms. I think that hollowed out bit was the vehicle deck, and then the huge doors at the front would open up. I didnt make it to that end though.

Haha i never came across the pallet of burkas though!
 

obscurity

Flaxenation of the G!!!
Regular User
cracking stuff there. Remember seeing this a few years ago and doubted you would be able to get near it without any bother from the port. Well done :thumb
 

KEITH MACLEOD

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Some History

RFA Sir Tristram L3505 is a Landing Ship Logistics of the Round Table class. She was launched in 1966, and accepted into British Army service in 1967.

View attachment 821679
Photo courtesy of Wikipedia


The Round Table Class, named after The Knights of the Round Table, was a British ship class designed for amphibious warfare missions in support of the main
amphibious warfare ships. Sir Tristram had bow doors leading onto the main vehicle deck, making it roll-on/roll-off, combined with ramps that led to
upper and lower vehicle decks. Thanks to its shallow draught, it could beach itself and use the bow doors for speedy unloading of troops and
equipment. The ship also had helicopter decks on both the upper vehicle deck and behind the superstructure.


View attachment 821681View attachment 821682
Photos courtesy of Wikipedia


In April 1982 RFA Sir Tristram was diverted from Belize to the Falkland Islands to take part in the British effort to retake the Falkland Islands.
On 8 June that year, while transporting men and equipment, the ship was attacked by A-4 Skyhawks from the Argentine Air Force, each loaded with three 500 lb
Mark 82 bombs.


View attachment 821685View attachment 821686
Photos courtesy of Wikipedia


At approximately 14:00 local time the decks were strafed and two crew were killed. A 500 lb bomb penetrated the deck, but failed to explode
immediately, allowing the remaining crew to be evacuated. Following the later explosion, Sir Tristram was abandoned.

Immediately following the end of the conflict, the ship was towed to Port Stanley, where she was used as an accommodation ship. Sir Tristram
then returned to the United Kingdom in 1983 on a heavy lift ship and was extensively rebuilt.


View attachment 821687
Photo courtesy of Wikipedia


Following the rebuild, the ship re-entered active service in 1985, and saw service in the Gulf War, and the Balkan conflicts of the 1990s. The ship supported
relief operations for Hurricane Mitch off Central America, then in 2000 the ship was deployed to Sierra Leone in support of British operations there, followed
by a cruise to the Baltic Sea in support of Mine Counter Measure Vessels. Early 2001 saw Sir Tristram return to Sierra Leone to take over from Sir Percivale as
the ship supporting British forces ashore there. In 2003 the ship was deployed as part of the largest British fleet for 20 years in support of the invasion of Iraq.

Sir Tristram was decommissioned on 17 December 2005 and permanently moored in Portland Harbour, Dorset. She continues to be used for training purposes by
the Special Boat Service and other elements of UK Special Forces Group.


View attachment 821690


On a warm summers day in August 2014, me and a few friends visiting Dorset decided we were going to paddle out to this ship and see if we
could get on it. I had previously read a rumour post about Sir Tristram, and this sparked my interest. To this day I have never seen another post about
the ship, so either no one else has been on it, or they just haven't made a report.

I've stalled doing this report for years, out of laziness and perhaps a little disappointment that the pictures weren't as good as they could have been.
For an average camera phone with a poor light, and an LED Lenser, stashed in a dry bag in 2014, I suppose they were okay.


View attachment 821691


We took our two kayaks, rented for two hours from Chesil beach, and paddled toward the ship. It took around 40 minutes to get there.

This was, and still is, the most enjoyable adventure I've ever had.


View attachment 821692

You don't realise how huge the ship is until you get close to it.

View attachment 821693



View attachment 821703


No access through this rear door.


View attachment 821704


The ship has a permanent landing platform attached to the side. The gate on the stairs was easy to climb around. Getting aboard was no trouble.

The only issue was 40 minutes paddling there meant 40 minutes paddling back, so that meant we only had 40 minutes to wander around the ship.

This was not enough.

I returned to the ship a few weeks later on a kayak rented for half a day.


View attachment 821706



View attachment 821707


Front and rear of the ship. In the distance you can an active Navy ship. They are often moored in the harbor.

After doing this explore my brother, who was with me on the second trip, but decided to catch makeral rather than explore an old naval ship, :oops:
said that his colleague at his school was saying that the Special Boat Service will give you hell if they catch you on there. Something about
detaining you for so many hours/days under anti terrorism charges.


View attachment 821709


The rear of the ship with some kind of walkway. Perhaps for training to jump in the sea. It was pretty high. I should have jumped!
Cheesy titanic pic, but I couldn't resist.



View attachment 821710


Rear of the ship from the end of the platform.


View attachment 821711


Inside the ships control room. This was accessible on the first visit, but then sealed up on the second.


View attachment 821712



View attachment 821713



View attachment 821714



View attachment 821715


Despite some decay, the ship was in well maintained state.


Time for a wander.


View attachment 821717


The ship had four zones. Red, Yellow, Blue, and Green. Red appeared to be the above deck areas.


View attachment 821716


Dining areas, then the kitchen. The kitchen was all decked out in stainless steel, with zero windows or natural light, low ceilings, and a variety of
fryers, ovens, hobs, and microwaves. Combine that with the swaying motion of a ship at sea and I bet it was the worst place to be a chef.


View attachment 821718



View attachment 821719



View attachment 821720


After the kitchen areas I found the hallway after hallway of mostly empty rooms. I imagine these would have been the living accommodation.

View attachment 821721



View attachment 821722



View attachment 821723

Keys to all the unlocked doors.


View attachment 821742

All toilets and sinks filled with expanding foam.

See extremely polite British sign on the wall--

'This vacuum system is easily blocked. Only the arisings from bodily processes and the associated paperwork are to be deposited in this w.c/urinal.'

:D


Part 2 pictures coming up...
Brilliant,thank you
 

nji1000

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Some History

RFA Sir Tristram L3505 is a Landing Ship Logistics of the Round Table class. She was launched in 1966, and accepted into British Army service in 1967.

View attachment 821679
Photo courtesy of Wikipedia


The Round Table Class, named after The Knights of the Round Table, was a British ship class designed for amphibious warfare missions in support of the main
amphibious warfare ships. Sir Tristram had bow doors leading onto the main vehicle deck, making it roll-on/roll-off, combined with ramps that led to
upper and lower vehicle decks. Thanks to its shallow draught, it could beach itself and use the bow doors for speedy unloading of troops and
equipment. The ship also had helicopter decks on both the upper vehicle deck and behind the superstructure.


View attachment 821681View attachment 821682
Photos courtesy of Wikipedia


In April 1982 RFA Sir Tristram was diverted from Belize to the Falkland Islands to take part in the British effort to retake the Falkland Islands.
On 8 June that year, while transporting men and equipment, the ship was attacked by A-4 Skyhawks from the Argentine Air Force, each loaded with three 500 lb
Mark 82 bombs.


View attachment 821685View attachment 821686
Photos courtesy of Wikipedia


At approximately 14:00 local time the decks were strafed and two crew were killed. A 500 lb bomb penetrated the deck, but failed to explode
immediately, allowing the remaining crew to be evacuated. Following the later explosion, Sir Tristram was abandoned.

Immediately following the end of the conflict, the ship was towed to Port Stanley, where she was used as an accommodation ship. Sir Tristram
then returned to the United Kingdom in 1983 on a heavy lift ship and was extensively rebuilt.


View attachment 821687
Photo courtesy of Wikipedia


Following the rebuild, the ship re-entered active service in 1985, and saw service in the Gulf War, and the Balkan conflicts of the 1990s. The ship supported
relief operations for Hurricane Mitch off Central America, then in 2000 the ship was deployed to Sierra Leone in support of British operations there, followed
by a cruise to the Baltic Sea in support of Mine Counter Measure Vessels. Early 2001 saw Sir Tristram return to Sierra Leone to take over from Sir Percivale as
the ship supporting British forces ashore there. In 2003 the ship was deployed as part of the largest British fleet for 20 years in support of the invasion of Iraq.

Sir Tristram was decommissioned on 17 December 2005 and permanently moored in Portland Harbour, Dorset. She continues to be used for training purposes by
the Special Boat Service and other elements of UK Special Forces Group.


View attachment 821690


On a warm summers day in August 2014, me and a few friends visiting Dorset decided we were going to paddle out to this ship and see if we
could get on it. I had previously read a rumour post about Sir Tristram, and this sparked my interest. To this day I have never seen another post about
the ship, so either no one else has been on it, or they just haven't made a report.

I've stalled doing this report for years, out of laziness and perhaps a little disappointment that the pictures weren't as good as they could have been.
For an average camera phone with a poor light, and an LED Lenser, stashed in a dry bag in 2014, I suppose they were okay.


View attachment 821691


We took our two kayaks, rented for two hours from Chesil beach, and paddled toward the ship. It took around 40 minutes to get there.

This was, and still is, the most enjoyable adventure I've ever had.


View attachment 821692

You don't realise how huge the ship is until you get close to it.

View attachment 821693



View attachment 821703


No access through this rear door.


View attachment 821704


The ship has a permanent landing platform attached to the side. The gate on the stairs was easy to climb around. Getting aboard was no trouble.

The only issue was 40 minutes paddling there meant 40 minutes paddling back, so that meant we only had 40 minutes to wander around the ship.

This was not enough.

I returned to the ship a few weeks later on a kayak rented for half a day.


View attachment 821706



View attachment 821707


Front and rear of the ship. In the distance you can an active Navy ship. They are often moored in the harbor.

After doing this explore my brother, who was with me on the second trip, but decided to catch makeral rather than explore an old naval ship, :oops:
said that his colleague at his school was saying that the Special Boat Service will give you hell if they catch you on there. Something about
detaining you for so many hours/days under anti terrorism charges.


View attachment 821709


The rear of the ship with some kind of walkway. Perhaps for training to jump in the sea. It was pretty high. I should have jumped!
Cheesy titanic pic, but I couldn't resist.



View attachment 821710


Rear of the ship from the end of the platform.


View attachment 821711


Inside the ships control room. This was accessible on the first visit, but then sealed up on the second.


View attachment 821712



View attachment 821713



View attachment 821714



View attachment 821715


Despite some decay, the ship was in well maintained state.


Time for a wander.


View attachment 821717


The ship had four zones. Red, Yellow, Blue, and Green. Red appeared to be the above deck areas.


View attachment 821716


Dining areas, then the kitchen. The kitchen was all decked out in stainless steel, with zero windows or natural light, low ceilings, and a variety of
fryers, ovens, hobs, and microwaves. Combine that with the swaying motion of a ship at sea and I bet it was the worst place to be a chef.


View attachment 821718



View attachment 821719



View attachment 821720


After the kitchen areas I found the hallway after hallway of mostly empty rooms. I imagine these would have been the living accommodation.

View attachment 821721



View attachment 821722



View attachment 821723

Keys to all the unlocked doors.


View attachment 821742

All toilets and sinks filled with expanding foam.

See extremely polite British sign on the wall--

'This vacuum system is easily blocked. Only the arisings from bodily processes and the associated paperwork are to be deposited in this w.c/urinal.'

:D


Part 2 pictures coming up...
Superb!
 

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