Web
Analytics
Report - - Rubha nan Sasan, Loch Ewe: Emergency Coastal Defence Battery | Military Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Rubha nan Sasan, Loch Ewe: Emergency Coastal Defence Battery



B

bryag

Guest
Guest
#1
Following up on info provided by Alir147:thumb I recce'd this site myself, then did a proper explore with Zimbob, on Tuesday 18th January.

A little history:
Coast artillery battery including 2 x 6in gun platforms, battery observation post, 2 x coast artillery searchlights, 2 x engine rooms, magazines and hut bases. The extensive remains of a Second World War emergency coast battery, built in 1941. Surviving structural elements include two gun houses in each of which a 6' Mark 7 (naval) gun would have been mounted, two searchlight emplacements, a battery observation post, engine houses or generating rooms, magazines and two emplacements for (possibly 20mm Oerlikon) anti-aircraft guns. The remains of other unidentified buildings can also be seen, while evidence of accommodation blocks survives in the form of concrete floors to the S and W, mainly outside the area proposed for scheduling. The battery was hastily erected at a time when there was a perceived threat of German attack on the British coast and, for this reason, is known as an emergency battery. The battery, as well as protecting the Loch Ewe anchorage, provided covering fire for an examination vessel which checked the credentials of all ships entering the anchorage. From January to September 1942 the site was manned by 308 Independent Coast Battery (Royal Artillery) and from September 1942 until April 1944 by 154 Independent Battery, after which date it was placed on a care and maintenance basis. There is no record of the battery ever firing in anger. Source: Historic Scotland
During WW2 Loch Ewe was "Black" with ships. It was said you could walk from one side of the loch to the other without getting your feet wet. This was the main port for the North Atlantic convoys, who would sail from these safe waters, into the frozen North Atlantic to provide Russia with much needed supplies. Under constant threat from U-boat and air attack, Loch Ewe was protected by anti aircraft posts, and an elaborate boom net. With a gate (operated by two trawlers) it would allow "friendly" ships entry. Rubha nan Sasan battery supported the examination vessel here which was responsible for checking the credentials of vessels wishing to enter. Source: My own research :D
OK, so that's the history lesson, on with the pics.

On arrival at the site, we spotted security
RubhananSasan001.jpg


As it was rocky moorland, there were nice pathways laid between all the buildings
RubhananSasan002.jpg


Concrete base atop the easterly peak
RubhananSasan003.jpg


A triangulation station
RubhananSasan004.jpg


View of the westerly site (from easterly peak)
RubhananSasan005.jpg


Small gun mounting. Perhaps 20mm anti-aircraft?
RubhananSasan006.jpg


Easterly CASL
RubhananSasan007.jpg


RubhananSasan008.jpg


Notice acroprop?
RubhananSasan009.jpg


It really was dangerous!
RubhananSasan010.jpg


Generator building (one of three)
RubhananSasan011.jpg


RubhananSasan012.jpg


Genrator Building (two of three)
RubhananSasan013.jpg


RubhananSasan014.jpg


Magazine? (one of two)
RubhananSasan015.jpg


Observation post
RubhananSasan016.jpg


RubhananSasan036.jpg


RubhananSasan037.jpg


To be continued.....
 
B

bryag

Guest
Guest
#2
Gun emplacement (one of two)
RubhananSasan017.jpg


RubhananSasan018.jpg


RubhananSasan019.jpg


RubhananSasan020.jpg


RubhananSasan021.jpg


RubhananSasan022.jpg


Gun emplacement (two of two)
RubhananSasan023.jpg


RubhananSasan024.jpg


RubhananSasan025.jpg


RubhananSasan026.jpg


RubhananSasan027.jpg


RubhananSasan028.jpg


Generator Housing (Three of Three)

RubhananSasan029.jpg


RubhananSasan030.jpg


RubhananSasan031.jpg


Steep path (with added slip protection!)
RubhananSasan032.jpg


CASL (Two of Two) Pretty scary!
RubhananSasan033.jpg


RubhananSasan034.jpg


Unidentified structure (one of one) Word "Practice" still on wall
RubhananSasan035.jpg


This is just one of the many defences around Loch Ewe. Sadly, there is little left of the others. We did visit the remains, and either Zimbob has already posted them, or I/he/we will shortly:thumb
 

zimbob

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
#3
Nice one - your pics came out well :thumb

A few of mine...

Site from the Triangulation thingy:
wayoutwest15jan2008PART1005.jpg


I was gutted.....
wayoutwest15jan2008PART1031.jpg


The Command post - I rather liked the stilts :eek:
wayoutwest15jan2008032.jpg


Noticed this stencilled inside:
wayoutwest15jan2008036.jpg


Must have been more recent visitors to the site, from what I can gather...
226 Signal Squadron (Electronic Warfare) provides EW support to Allied Command Europe Rapid Reaction Corps (ARRC), which consists of troops from several countries. 640 Signal Tp (EW), which is part of the Squadron, provides EW support to the Joint Rapid Deployment Force (JRDF). This gives them the unique role of deploying to trouble spots world-wide ready to assist in challenging operations. The Squadron has a wide variety of equipment, including Clansman radios, specialist EW equipment and computer based systems.
(Royal Corps of Signals website)

A shot of one of the emplacements in action:
wayoutwest15jan2008042.jpg


Moody (or crappy :eek:) shot:
wayoutwest15jan2008027.jpg


I was loving the corrosion on this site - salt spray even up here, had to keep cleaning the lense:
wayoutwest15jan2008016.jpg


Good old West Coast favourite wriggly tin again - used as shuttering throughout:
wayoutwest15jan2008010.jpg


These handy wee paths went to all installations:
wayoutwest15jan2008018.jpg


Last shot of the site, great location!
wayoutwest15jan2008007.jpg


Really enjoyed this one, in spite of the freezing weather :D