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Report - - Völklingen Ironworks, Saarland, Germany | Industrial Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Völklingen Ironworks, Saarland, Germany


Moelwyn

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Völklingen Ironworks is located in western Germany close to the border with France. The steelworks closed in 1986 and was added to the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1994.

Völklingen Ironworks is a 5 minute walk from Völklingen station on the line between Saarbrücken and Trier. Admission to the site is € 17.00. My visit was in September 2020 and I was intending to visit for a couple of hours. I actually spent 5 hours there as there’s so much to see and even then I skipped some parts of the site. Information signage is in English. Well worth a visit if you get the opportunity.

The 'Völklinger Hütte' was founded in 1873 on the banks of the Saar river by Julius Buch. Under the direction of the Röchling family (from 1881 on) it developed into one of the most important iron and steel works in Europe. The site covers 6 hectares and is a unique monument to pig-iron production in Western Europe. No other historic blast-furnace complex has survived that demonstrates the entire process of pig-iron production in the same way, with the same degree of authenticity and completeness, and is underlined by such a series of technological milestones in innovative engineering. The Völklingen works illustrates the industrial history of the 19th century in general and also the transnational Saar-Lorraine-Luxembourg industrial region in the heart of Europe in particular. The iron-making complex dominates the townscape of Völklingen and during its heyday around the mid-1960s, 17.000 people worked there. It contains installations covering every stage in the pig-iron production process, from raw materials handling and processing equipment for coal and iron ore to blast-furnace iron production, with all the ancillary equipment, such as gas purification and blowing equipment.

The installations are exactly as they were when production ceased in 1986. The overall appearance is that of an ironworks from the 1930s, since no new installations were added after the rebuilding of the coking plant in 1935. There is considerable evidence of the history of the works in the form of individual items that have preserved substantial elements of their original form. Large sections of the frames and platforms of the blast furnaces, for example, have not been altered since their installation at the turn of the 19th to 20th centuries. Much of the original coking plant survives, despite the 1935 reconstruction, notably the coal tower of 1898. Six of the gas-blowing engines, built between 1905 and 1914, are preserved, as are the suspended conveyer system of 1911 and the dry gas purification plant of the same time. In addition, remains of Buch´s puddle ironworks of 1873 are preserved in the power station below the blast furnaces.

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Bikin Glynn

28DL Regular User
Regular User
.Now thats a proper bit of industrial rustage! even if its permission its really nice
 

Joaraser

28DL Member
28DL Member
Wow, it's very interesting, I would love to go there myself and go around the whole plant. I think such objects are very interesting.
 

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