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Report - - Water Treatment Works, North Wales : May 2023 | Industrial Sites | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Water Treatment Works, North Wales : May 2023

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JakeV50

28DL Regular User
Regular User
Water Treatment Works

Every year, me and Dan end up in wales on an urbex trip. We have been every year for the past 4 years (I think) and we always manage to find something to do. Fresh places are starting to get thin on the ground now. Neither of us really care if we don't get to do any pins, it's just nice to be away from Norfolk and have miles of Wales to get lost in. Excited to see what this years trip will bring!

This was as a result of our most recent trip back this time last year. We done the classics including Octel, Porth Wen, Gafnan Corn Mill, all of which we've seen before, but It's enjoyable to go back and see these again, and several new places. The treatment works featured in this report I found by chance while taking the scenic route home from a holiday up there back in late 2020, without dan that time. I stopped and looked at it but at the time, didn't really know what it was. It's not until I found this strange obsession with water related sites that I remembered it and told Dan we should check it out next time we're up there.

As always with these, history is non-existent. The site doesn't even come up on older OS maps which is annoying. Inside sit a pair of Worthington Simpson pumps attached via pipework to two large upright open-top tanks, there are a couple of other storage tanks inside the building. There is a second floor which is pretty much bare apart from a few control valves. Outside sits what I presume is a small filter bed and there is an underground reservoir which is sealed. There are fresh signs in this area so perhaps that's still used. I remeber the entrance was a pain. It was a small metal framed window, one of them types that rotates in the middle, an almighty squeeze resulted in me catching my arse and ripping my jeans on a shard of glass sticking up out of the frame. Then jumping down into the building and landing on a sheep carcass, with the nasty 'crack' of snapping bones.

Starting with an external


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Moving upstairs

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Some of the locals watching

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tigger

mog
Regular User
I feel like this has been on here before.....Dan did a report?
Almost certainly late 1950s build. The 543 is an interesting route for water infrastructure, both large and small, and even more general urbex (probably especially good for lovers of pointless soggy house remains).
 

JakeV50

28DL Regular User
Regular User
I feel like this has been on here before.....Dan did a report?
Almost certainly late 1950s build. The 543 is an interesting route for water infrastructure, both large and small, and even more general urbex (probably especially good for lovers of pointless soggy house remains).
I believe he did looking back now.
Like you say, I did notice alot on that route. It's not a bad driving road either.
 
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