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Tips for a new photographer


Bikin Glynn

28DL Regular User
Regular User
Agree with above, u can just shoot in auto & some do forever but your photography will step up a level once u start using manual.
I just use hand held torch for all my dark places & never have an issue (have a look at some of my threads).
As mentioned good tripod is pretty essential if u in anywhere dark, I can pretty much get away doing handheld up to 0.3sec shutter but any slower & have to b on tripod
I assume the 4000 has a live view? That's much easier for getting exposures right when exploring.
As someone mentioned a good bag is worth it's weight in gold too.
 

paulpowers

Massive Member
Regular User
Take a shit ton of pictures, literally fucking loads
Work out which pictures you like and what works for you

Watch a few youtube videos for techniques, read a couple of books

Enjoy it
 

zombizza

Pink
Regular User
Shoot in RAW. for the vast majority of my derelict photography i never did and boy do i regret it.
You can pretty much rescue any photo in raw. I had one occasion where my mode dial got changed accidentally. It was in a rather frantic session where I was on the run from security so I did not check my images as I was taking them. They were all several stops under exposed as a result-they essentially looked black on the screen. But because I had shot in RAW I was able to increase exposure to normal and get all the details back. I in fact bracket all my shots. This means I can pick the best of 3 when looking through them. Quite often the under exposed 1 turns out to be the best.
 

Bikin Glynn

28DL Regular User
Regular User
Shoot in RAW. for the vast majority of my derelict photography i never did and boy do i regret it.
You can pretty much rescue any photo in raw. I had one occasion where my mode dial got changed accidentally. It was in a rather frantic session where I was on the run from security so I did not check my images as I was taking them. They were all several stops under exposed as a result-they essentially looked black on the screen. But because I had shot in RAW I was able to increase exposure to normal and get all the details back. I in fact bracket all my shots. This means I can pick the best of 3 when looking through them. Quite often the under exposed 1 turns out to be the best.
been there too, knocked my wb to florescent in one place I knew I wasnt getting back in!
Everything came out yellowed, bit gutted but managed to pull em back in lightroom.
 

lpphevs

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
been there too, knocked my wb to florescent in one place I knew I wasnt getting back in!
Everything came out yellowed, bit gutted but managed to pull em back in lightroom.
I shot without RAW for a long time but it makes a big difference for photos in dark places or night, or overexposed shots for that matter. I set my camera to take both jpeg and raw and then delete all but the shots I want to play with the lighting for, as otherwise it eats your storage
 

Bikin Glynn

28DL Regular User
Regular User
I shot without RAW for a long time but it makes a big difference for photos in dark places or night, or overexposed shots for that matter. I set my camera to take both jpeg and raw and then delete all but the shots I want to play with the lighting for, as otherwise it eats your storage
Ditto I shoot RAW & jpeg large now a days
 

LashedLlama

Sauter Les Frontières
28DL Full Member
The main tips I would say is:

1. Rule of thirds for good composition
2. Understand shutter speed, ISO, aperture to expose correctly
3. Understand what different effects zoomed and wide focal lengths give
4. KEEP HORIZONS STRAIGHT! (It makes such a difference)
5. Once you're comfortable try long exposures in dark places/at night
And definitely ditch the kit-lens when possible aye Liam ;)
 

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