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Report - - Markeaton Interceptor AKA Flo Selecta, Derby, February 2019 | UK Draining Forum | 28DaysLater.co.uk

Report - Markeaton Interceptor AKA Flo Selecta, Derby, February 2019


chills

Check out my Instagram: @ChillsSnaps
28DL Full Member
History:

The Markeaton Brook is an 11-mile-long (17 km) tributary of the River Derwent in Derbyshire, England. The brook rises from its source south of Hulland Ward, and flows for most of its length through the countryside north-west of Derby before entering a culvert to the north of the city centre; it reappears from this culvert and runs through a short section of open channel on the other side of the city before joining the Derwent.

In the early 1930s there were two major floods caused by the brook, which provided the impetus to find a solution, and prevent further flooding in Derby. The first was in September 1931 when heavy rain across Derbyshire, caused substantial flooding from the brook in the centre of the town. The second flood occurred less than a year later in May 1932; again intense rainfall caused the brook to overflow, with considerable flooding throughout the central shopping quarter. A contemporary account recalls that; "Water poured into the streets and many houses were filled to a depth of six or seven feet. In the low-lying parts of the town it gathered quickly and, by ten o’clock on this memorable Sunday morning, shops in the Cornmarket, St James’s Street and the bottom end of St Peter’s Street were immersed half-way up the windows. The centre of town presented the appearance of a lake and the sight was unforgettable."
Following the flood, the Mayor of Derby set up a flood fund and a souvenir booklet costing 6d, was produced by the YMCA to raise money for those who houses and businesses had been affected. Damage to the town was estimated at £400,000. (equivalent to £27,274,283 as of 2018).

Following the floods of 1931 and 1932, the Borough council arranged for an investigation to be carried out into the flooding problem within the catchment. The planned solution was the construction of two flood relief culverts, with associated improvements to the sewerage system. Opened in 1938, the largest of the diversion tunnels was called the Northern Flood Relief Culvert, and drains excess flows from the Markeaton and Mackworth brooks. The second, known as the Bramble brook culvert takes surplus flows for that tributary stream.

The northern relief culvert commences at Markeaton Park, near to the confluence of the Markeaton and Mackworth brooks. Each brook has its own inlet spillway, with a weir that overflows during periods of high flows. Flows from these inlets converge, and are then taken by the relief culvert eastwards for 2.2 km through the suburbs of Derby, to an outfall with the Derwent in Darley Park.
In 2006, the inlet works were improved and upgraded to cope with changes in the catchment that have occurred since the original design.


The Explore:

So today I popped my draining cherry, a what a place to start!
After having a chat with Punk, we organised to hit Flo Selecta. After a little navigation which involved my welly getting stuck between a fence, very stealthy, we entered and it exceeded my expectations!
Looking back on the first of two overflow inlets, we entered the long 1.2ish mile culvert minding not to slip. Soon we reached a junction, and turning back on ourselves we headed to the other overflow. The second was identically mirrored to the first and the sunlight shone through the bars.
Back into the culvert, brick and concrete joined to create a tunnel that looks like parts were built in separate years but conjoined beautifully.
Further on, stalegtights hung from the ceiling and calcium covered the walls. Metal steps with led up to surface covers every so often marked by capitalised spray painted markings informing which part we were under. Off to a few sides there were separate inlets that dropped like steps; Punk informed me this is to slow the water flow inward.
Finally as we turned a corner a small amount of sunlight was seen and we had reached the outfall that then continues into the Derwent.
We headed back through and with Punks' torch low on battery we exited.

Thanks to Punk for the opportunity on this one! All in all, a great explore and day with a great guy! Rewind when the crowd say Flo Selecta! :thumb

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chills

Check out my Instagram: @ChillsSnaps
28DL Full Member
Good effort :thumb
Thanks Ojay! Would love to revisit at some point to do it some justice!
Definitely need a good torch for some lighting which I'm looking into right now; thanks again for Punk for providing that today!
 

LittleOwl

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Great location, glad your wellie survived the ordeal
 

Punk

Irregular Member
Regular User
Nicely done, your shots have come out well.
It was good to meet you.
That fencing makes me think they don't want us going in there :rolleyes:
 

pastybarm

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Always good to see this big drain in the historical city again. Did they ever discover what was making them noises in the sewers in the end?
 

pastybarm

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Blimey, everyone quoting part of the artful dodger makes me feel old now.....sod that, where's me poppers!
 

tarkovsky

'Exploring with Sciatica'
Regular User
Isn’t the full name ‘Captain Birdseye’s Flo Selecta’ too, on account of the fish? The name always makes me smile.
 

pastybarm

28DL Full Member
28DL Full Member
Was this the one some blokes got trapped in, and the council or water board was going on about unsafe, and the manholes got locked down? I think they got trapped near the outfall.
 

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